Hi everyone,

It's been a little while since I've popped in and shared something but I hope everyone is doing well.

I've been working on a big project at DPG since the start of the year moving our online community from a Ning 2.0 (same platform that this community uses) to the new version which is called Ning 3.0

It's a completely new platform which provides many more features and options to help you create a thriving community. It's not finished yet in terms of development but there were enough improvements for us to be early adopters and make the move.

The DPG Community won a Learning Award early this year in the Social & Collaborative learning category so we were keen to build on this success and learn from what had worked well and improve areas that we knew could be improved. Our users feedback has played a BIG part in this and it's been great seeing the community grow and evolve with now over 2500 members.

Are any members of this group currently working on developing online communities?

I'd be keen to hear on how you've approached it, what's worked well, what have been your challenges?

How have to overcome them?

What have been your successes?

The DPG Community is still work in progress and I guess always will be but if you're interested in HR and L&D then why not take a look and feel free to sign up.

The DPG Community

If it's something you're starting to look at or know this is something your own organisation would benefit from then you should know L&D are in a great position to help support, develop and nurture these communities to take form and grow.

Here are a couple of good article I've come across recently that might be useful 

10 tips to create a Corporate Learning Community of Practice

Developing Communities of Practice

Be good to get some conversation going on this subject and I'm keen to learn what others are doing in this space.

Mike 

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