Hi all,

We're currently in the process of rolling out Sharepoint 2010 and one of my jobs is to look at getting users to engage with the social networking side, especially in a learning and development way.

We're going to have a L&D general area alongside the usual profiles and team pages. I was wondering how those of you currently using the software have done so, whether you have any tips or ideas or know of any websites, reports, books, etc, that would be worth me investigating?

Look forward to your responses.

Andy

 

 

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Hi Andy

My recommendation would be:-

1. It's the subject matter that drives engagement so ensure you have strong communities and identify those people that can contribute to the debate - and remember, it's ask that works well, not tell!

2. Try to ensure that your communities are cross function - communities that are restricted to a single function will lack the "wow" factor.

3.Take an L&D position that it's your responsibility to facilitate the communities and the collaboration; it's actually quite difficult to adopt an ask mode rather than a tell mode - and get others to do the same - but that's precisely what is needed.

4. Adopt the champion/ challenger approach to governance - ensure that nobody "loses" in a debate - everyone wins if there's clarity where previously it was fog!

5. All of the above implies the obvious - it's the content that's key and not the technology! And you can't possibly take the  lead on content (that's down to subject matter experts) so your role is decidedly one of facilitation.

Hope that helps

Hi Andy - we use SP 2007 and I'm not that familiar with the additional functionalities in 2010 but apparently the social functions are better.

I agree with all Alan points above / below.

 

You mention that L&D will have an area, profile and team pages - is this to engage with people about L&D or for L&D to engage with each other?

 

At the moment we're not using SharePoint as a platform to support learning in the sense that we're actively using it as part of a learning solution or formal programme however where we have really benefited from it is by using it ourselves. This has mainly been done using discussions, team blogs and sharing links but it has created a different dynamic now across the team and helped us to collaborate and shift to a mentality of you are what you share. We can genuinely see how these tools can support learning in other ways and when we're in a position to do this we'll be using SP to support some of our existing learning solutions.

I would say that if you're intending to use SharePoint and it's social features to enhance learning in your organisation my recommendation would be to get your team using the tool first and become experts as if you are going to use the tool to support learning in your organisation you will need people who can use it and have used it first hand to support their own learning / working.

 

Hi Andy,

I work for KorteQ, a niche knowledge management consulting organisation.  We have recently developed some additional social networking features for a client using SharePoint 2010 that allow individuals to 'follow' specific projects and team members.  This gives people a much greater opportunity to interact with each other (and other site content) than would normally be the case with the 'out of the box' functionality.  

Following your aim to specifically enhance learning and development aspects you might wish to consider how to link general everyday social interactions to more formalised learning processes.  For example can some exchanges be recorded against coaching / mentoring objectives or used to develop wiki-style learning resources.

For more resources I also recommend the AIIM website; http://www.aiim.org/social-business/

Please feel free to contact me if you wish to know more.

Roger

roger.clark@korteq.com

 

Hi Andy


We're currently trialling Newsgator on SharePoint for exactly this purpose. It's still early days but initial reactions have been good, it might be worth checking out their approach.

Best regards

 

Iain

Hi Andy

I am the SP Demand Manager for GlaxoSmithKline and apart from all the other good stuff already mentioned what I have found to be most successful is strong Business Change Management, aligned with an ability to listen and understand Business needs.

We never "talk IT" - SharePoint is never discussed as anything but a means of helping individuals, teams, organisations and entire Business Units to achieve their business goals.

Getting people to understand what's in it for them, as opposed to "do it or else you'll lose your existing stuff" (i.e. more carrot and a lot less stick) works better every time.

Not sure this helps but I'd be happy to talk in more depth if you'd like.

Cheers!

Phil

 

Hi Andy

I am the SP Demand Manager for GlaxoSmithKline and apart from all the other good stuff already mentioned what I have found to be most successful is strong Business Change Management, aligned with an ability to listen and understand Business needs.

We never "talk IT" - SharePoint is never discussed as anything but a means of helping individuals, teams, organisations and entire Business Units to achieve their business goals.

Getting people to understand what's in it for them, as opposed to "do it or else you'll lose your existing stuff" (i.e. more carrot and a lot less stick) works better every time.

Not sure this helps but I'd be happy to talk in more depth if you'd like.

Cheers!

Phil

I would suggest allowing people the freedom to build their own learning content and having champions in the business who discuss the merits on a 'viral' basis.  Just look at facebook, twitter and linkedin.  I totally agree with Phil, the big question will be 'whats in it for me'

We have Yammer as well as SharePoint.  The one thing I've noticed is that SP seems to encourage "closed" communities, whereas Yammer enables more of a free-for-all, cross-business area discussion.  I'm sure the latter is just down to how we've set it up, so I'd recommend trying to inadvertantly create too many virtual silos.

 

 

IT's difficult to add to what's already been said but I think you can take from that how important it is to be able to display and show what the value of the tool is to everyone that is going to be able to use it? A top of the range lawnmower is no good if it's not not going to bring you any value with the extra gadgets, it's there well.. just because. Having the tool is all well and good its what you do with it that counts so make sure you're able to get this across to people.

Also really consider the conundrum of which comes first.. Community or Content? Without one can there be the other? Do you need users or posts? To this end it's important to identify those people that are already bought in and can role model the value mentioned earlier, hopefully that way more and more people will gradually be able to identify with this and them and start to find and bring their own value.

 

Just noticed the original post is from last year, would be good to hear how things are progressing for you Andy.

Cheers

I am sure you know about the Dare 2 Share project at BT which used SharePoint I believe http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtVYkEdGtfo for them user generated content led the interest in the networking

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